Partnering to Help Veteran Farmers

Partnering to Help Veteran Farmers

May 8, 2018

NASHVILLE, Tenn (RFD-TV) Tractor Supply Company will honor 50 veteran farmers during an Armed Forces Day “shopping event” later this month, as they partner with the Farmer Veteran Coalition, the nation’s largest nonprofit assisting veterans who are starting careers in agriculture.

The Farmer Veteran Fellowship fund is a small grant program overseen by the Farmer Veteran Coalition, which offers awards to veterans launching farm businesses. Since 2011, the fund has awarded 1.9 million dollars to more than 500 veterans.

Representatives from each organization joined us on today’s edition of “Market Day Report” to further explain this unique and promising partnership. See what they had to say in the videos above.

  • NEWSMore>>

  • Dakotas duck hunters seeing positive trends in conditions

    Dakotas duck hunters seeing positive trends in conditions

    Thursday, September 19 2019 4:57 PM EDT2019-09-19 20:57:49 GMT

    FARGO, N.D. (AP) — After weathering ups and downs in wetland conditions for the last few years, duck hunters in North Dakota and South Dakota are seeing positive trends in the popular waterfowl states. 

    FARGO, N.D. (AP) — After weathering ups and downs in wetland conditions for the last few years, duck hunters in North Dakota and South Dakota are seeing positive trends in the popular waterfowl states. 

  • Colt will no longer make AR-15 available to civilians

    Colt will no longer make AR-15 available to civilians

    Thursday, September 19 2019 4:26 PM EDT2019-09-19 20:26:55 GMT

    Gun manufacture Colt will no longer sell AR-15's to civilians citing an "adequate supply" on the market.

    Gun manufacture Colt will no longer sell AR-15's to civilians citing an "adequate supply" on the market.

  • Effects of Mississippi River Levels Continue

    Effects of Mississippi River Levels Continue

    Thursday, September 19 2019 4:07 PM EDT2019-09-19 20:07:27 GMT

    The Mississippi River is back to normal in Louisiana, but some folks are still dealing with the effects. The high river levels have kept away those who normally bale hay on the river's levees. The state’s hay season usually wraps up by September or October, but they may go as late as November, depending on this year’s first frost. This Week in Louisiana Ag's Neil Melancon has more.

    The Mississippi River is back to normal in Louisiana, but some folks are still dealing with the effects. The high river levels have kept away those who normally bale hay on the river's levees. The state’s hay season usually wraps up by September or October, but they may go as late as November, depending on this year’s first frost. This Week in Louisiana Ag's Neil Melancon has more.

Powered by Frankly
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2019 Frankly and RFDTV. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service , and Ad Choices .