Ohio seeks tougher penalties for animal cruelty

Ohio seeks tougher penalties for animal cruelty

Posted: Updated:

The Ohio State Senate has introduced a bill seeking tougher penalties for those who abuse or kill "companion animals," meaning any animal kept inside the home. 

Additionally, all dogs and cats are protected in the bill. 

Currently, the offense of knowingly and needlessly killing a pet is only a first-degree misdemeanor. Under the new proposal, it would be upped to a third-degree felony. 

In Ohio, third-degree felonies carry a penalty of 9-36 months in prison and a maximum fine of $10,000. The new classification would increase the chances of jail time for animal abusers. 

You can read the bill in its entirety here

  • NEWSMore>>

  • New tech tools helping New Mexico count secretive cougars

    New tech tools helping New Mexico count secretive cougars

    Wednesday, October 23 2019 4:44 PM EDT2019-10-23 20:44:34 GMT

    LINCOLN NATIONAL FOREST, N.M. (AP) — New technology is allowing New Mexico to estimate its elusive cougar population more accurately, state wildlife officials say. 

    LINCOLN NATIONAL FOREST, N.M. (AP) — New technology is allowing New Mexico to estimate its elusive cougar population more accurately, state wildlife officials say. 

  • Publix offering Veteran's Day discount

    Publix offering Veteran's Day discount

    Wednesday, October 23 2019 4:18 PM EDT2019-10-23 20:18:19 GMT

    Southeastern grocery chain Publix is offering a 10 percent discount to veterans, active military personnel and their families on Nov. 11.  

    Southeastern grocery chain Publix is offering a 10 percent discount to veterans, active military personnel and their families on Nov. 11.  

  • Hurricane Michael left lasting impact on Southeast

    Hurricane Michael left lasting impact on Southeast

    Wednesday, October 23 2019 4:17 PM EDT2019-10-23 20:17:27 GMT

    Hurricane Michael left a lasting mark on agriculture in the Southeast, with pecan tree's ripped from their roots, and peanuts destroyed by pounding rains. The Georgia Farm Monitor's John Holcomb spent time with producers who are still picking up the pieces one year later.

    Hurricane Michael left a lasting mark on agriculture in the Southeast, with pecan tree's ripped from their roots, and peanuts destroyed by pounding rains. The Georgia Farm Monitor's John Holcomb spent time with producers who are still picking up the pieces one year later.

Powered by Frankly
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2019 Frankly and RFDTV. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service , and Ad Choices .