Python hunters wanted in Southern Florida

Python hunters wanted in Southern Florida

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Beginning in 2017, the South Florida Water Management Board began taking "aggressive action to protect the Everglades and eliminate invasive pythons from its public lands," and now they are looking to add to the force of their Python Elimination Program.

Python hunter receive A minimum wage hourly rate up to 10 hours daily with additional payments of $50 for each python measuring more than 4 feet, with additional bonuses for greater lengths. Members of the Python Elimination Program are also rewarded $200 for finding pythons guarding nests or eggs. 

The program is in place to humanely euthanize the destructive snakes, which have become the apex predator of the Everglades, according to the Water Board's website. They are looking to add 25-35 people to the program. 

Since its inception in April of 2017, more than 2,500 pythons have been eliminated. 

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