Russia attacks Odesa port again; what country benefits most from the Grain Deal

Ukrainian officials say Russian forces have again hit grain terminals in the Black Sea Port of Odesa.

Ukraine accuses Russia of trying to stop grain shipments out of the region, just two days after Moscow backed out of the deal. The port was attacked yesterday as well.

Despite the reported attacks, Ukraine is finding new ways to ship grain out of the country now that the Black Sea Deal is dead. New data shows it was not the poorest nation’s who were benefiting the most from the deal.

Voyage data compiled by the United Nations shows China received the most cargo loads during the deal. Ukraine shipped 8 million tons of grain to China, which is roughly a quarter of all grains sent out under the initiative.

On Cow Guy Close, Tommy Grisafi told Scott Shellady the rise in corn prices after the deal fell apart was surprising, but it is good for farmers.

“I’m happy for the American farmer that they get to sell corn up $0.35 today. I’m sad for myself because I’ve been doing this my whole life, and last night corn was down five, and all of a sudden it’s up 35. The other day wheat was here, then it’s here. The problem is yes, the power and the corruptness, Ukraine was corrupt before this happened. Then you throw what’s happening. Every day I get a notification saying we’re sending a billion dollars over there. Now you have Europe saying they’re shutting down the Swift program and want to start trade with Russia again. This Ukraine thing is really nasty, but yes you’re right about that interview you did this morning, grain prices until this morning were much much lower.”

Russia has said it will only re-enter the agreement if key demands are met, including reconnection into the Swift payment system.

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