USDA Meteorologist: Canadian wildfires could impact U.S. corn, soybean crops

USDA Meteorologist Brad Rippey has concerns about U.S. crops and the indirect impact the smoke could have on corn and soybeans.

Canadian wildfires remain the big story on Thursday with bad air quality spreading as far south as the Southern United States.

More than 400 fires are burning in nearly every Canadian province. So far eight million acres have been scorched — with more dry, hot weather in the forecast.

USDA Meteorologist Brad Rippey has concerns about U.S. crops and the indirect impact the smoke could have on corn and soybeans. Rippey says as the smoke rolls into the corn belt, it blocks the sunlight and lowers temperatures, which could cause the crops to rot.

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