Bringing in the Trees: How the ongoing drought is impacting supplies of a Christmas staple

Drought has taken a toll on durum wheat, sugarcane and feed supplies this year, and now it’s impacting Christmas tree supplies.

Drought has taken a toll on durum wheat, sugarcane and feed supplies this year, and now it’s impacting Christmas tree supplies.

The Real Christmas Tree Board told Brownfield Ag News that southern producers are bringing in extra trees from northern regions to make it through the season. The Executive Director for the group says the north grows a different and faster developing tree that only takes about four years to grow.

About two-thirds of consumers will make their real Christmas tree purchase in the coming week.

Related Stories
Jalyssa Beaudry tells Brownfield Ag News that 75 percent of the dairy farmers she interviewed do not use automated milking systems on their operations.
Potatoes USA developed new software to see just how popular their product really is.

LATEST STORIES BY THIS AUTHOR:
The European Agriculture Commissioner is proposing a policy shift as farmers continue to protest, suggesting an EU-wide change on rules that limit ag production, saying the current laws raise food security risks.
USDA Meteorologist Brad Rippey says we are heading into spring rather quickly and ahead of schedule, which could have negative implications for small grains and blooming fruit crops.
U.S. pork exports could outpace both chicken and beef shipments in the coming decade.
A new survey shows the national economic impact of the equine industry last year, adding an additional $55 billion to the U.S. economy in 2023 than in 2022.
Iowa lawmakers are asking the U.S. Education Dept. for clarity on a new FAFSA question asking students to list family farm assets, which could reduce their grant.
Texas A&M‘s Ag & Food Policy Chief, Dr. Joe Outlaw, predicts lawmakers may not draft a new Farm Bill until 2025, missing the first deadline by nearly two years.
According to Tom Perez, Senior Advisor to the President, more Americans are enrolled in the Affordable Connectivity Program than those receiving SNAP benefits.