Drought looms over California as snowpack hits alarming low

The Sierra Nevada snow, vital for two-thirds of the state’s residents and irrigated farmland, is facing a drastic decline compared to the robust snowpack of the previous year.

Californians are grappling with a water crisis as the state’s snowpack registers at a mere 25 percent of the historical average, sparking concerns among water managers about potential cutbacks in farm water deliveries for the upcoming spring and summer.

Despite reservoir levels standing at 116 percent of the average statewide, this dry winter poses significant challenges. The Sierra Nevada snow, vital for two-thirds of the state’s residents and irrigated farmland, is facing a drastic decline compared to the robust snowpack of the previous year.

Water managers are bracing for a substantial reduction, expecting to deliver only 10 percent of the requested supplies. The implications of this dwindling snowpack extend beyond the immediate future, impacting not only agricultural operations but also raising alarms for California’s overall water sustainability.

Stay tuned for updates on how the state navigates these water woes and adapts to the changing landscape in the face of a parched winter.

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After years of drought, farmers across U.S. farm country are getting so much rainfall that it’s dampening their spring planting progress later into the season.

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