Drought Roundtable: It is an “uncertain and concerning” outlook for Texas and Kansas

The latest drought monitor was released this morning and it shows most of the Eastern part of the U.S. received precipitation last week. The areas with the most rain even had cooler temperatures, with much of the Midwest and Southeast cooler than normal. That helped relieve some of that fast-spreading drought we have been seeing.

It is a different case in the western U.S. From Montana to Texas, where temperatures were recorded as six to eight degrees over normal. Conditions worsened in the Southern Plains, with more reports of flash drought.

John Jenkinson with Kearny County Bank in Southwest Kansas and Reagan Noland with Texas A&M AgriLife Extension in San Angelo, Texas joined RFD-TV’s own Janet Adkison for a roundtable about how the record heatwave is having an impact on drought conditions, crops, and livestock.

Related:

Drought Roundtable: How two close states differ in conditions

From Flash Droughts to Windstorms: The latest on weather impacting ag country

Drought Roundtable: Analysts reveal how farmers in their states are feeling the brunt






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