Finding Common Ground: What are lawmakers saying about Farm Bill spending?

We are no closer to having a final Farm Bill than we were when the legislation expired in September. However, ag leaders in Washington remain hopeful one can be passed soon.

We are no closer to having a final Farm Bill than we were when the legislation expired in September. However, ag leaders in Washington remain hopeful one can be passed soon.

SNAP has been a major sticking point on both sides of the aisle. Republicans have long said they want to see major cuts to the nutrition title but that topic has been off the table for Democrats.

At a recent hearing on Capitol Hill, House Ag Committee Ranking Member David Scott said changes in monetary projections could make up for the cuts Republicans have been seeking.

“Because the economy has improved, benefits and need for the program have decreased. The CBO is now expecting snap to cost $67 billion less over the next decade than originally expected.”

Committee Chair GT Thompson has made bipartisanship a key topic during farm bill discussions. He says it is important for both sides to focus on what is truly important.

“Considerable opportunities exist within our jurisdiction to not only fund the safety net but fund a substantial number of shared bipartisan priorities. And I continue to implore my democratic colleagues to think in earnest about these priorities – priorities that can be funded without cutting snap, a snap benefit, or eliminating the important conservation programs that we’ve all come to appreciate.”

Thompson also says he is not afraid of criticism. He notes every negative comment helps intensify his commitment to American farmers and continue working to get the Farm Bill done.

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