Forestry

In the vast landscapes of the American West, public lands are critical resources, especially for rural communities. This is the backdrop for the Rio Chama Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Project (CFLRP), a transformative initiative spanning 3.8 million acres.
If you’re a fan of RFD-TV’s Where the Food Comes From, you might recall visiting Larry Smith’s idyllic Christmas Tree farm in rural North Carolina. This year, ahead of the holidays, we are taking a look back at the classic episode from Season 2 with a host of new, behind-the-scenes and bonus content to enjoy!
Fall foliage mixed with drought conditions across the Southern U.S. are increasing the wildfire risk across the region, providing temporary fuel for 10 big, new blazes in the last week. However, incoming wet weather should slightly tamper that risk, according to USDA Meteorologist Brad Rippey in his latest update for farmers.
U.S. Dept of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack announced Thursday the department will invest $1.13 billion into an initiative to distribute trees across the country in order to combat “extreme heat and climate change and improve access to nature in cities, towns, and suburbs where more than 84% of Americans live, work, and play.”
When you think of the logging and timber industry, misty scenes from the Pacific Northwest might come to mind. However, a transformation has occurred in recent years, with Southern states like Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia emerging as some of America’s leading timber producers.
As extreme heat bears down on a large portion of the country, crews from across Louisiana are battling intense wildfires in Beauregard Parish.
Alabama resident, professor, and forestry expert Maggard says shares his work with the Forest Business Resources program.
U.S. Forest Service scientists just launched a project aimed at boosting bee populations.
While Georgia might be known as the Peach State, it also is home to the largest forestry industry in the United States.
Life can get a little overwhelming from time to time. UT Extension wants you to know that a simple walk in the woods can benefit both your mental and physical health.
The first Arbor Day was celebrated in Nebraska City back in the 1870s. Now, the national holiday is held across the US the last Friday of April. Learn more about it’s history, what trees are best for your backyard or farm, and how you might be able to find free ones to plant!