Iowa has reinstated poultry quarantine measures due to HPAI

After recent outbreaks of High Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Iowa forced an end to all live bird exhibitions, the state’s Department of Agriculture is warning everyone to take caution when working with poultry. However, they say there is no reason to worry about the virus making its way to the Thanksgiving table.

“Birds that are impacted by High Path do not end up in the supply chain. They do not end up going to food production because we detect and contain, and we’re dealing with those birds on that farm, and so they are never entering commerce. It’s the same with egg production. You know there are no eggs that are coming off of farms that are positive for High Path, and so that’s one thing that folks can know for sure.

“The other piece is, and again, this is just the nuts and bolts of food safety as you ought to be preparing poultry correctly anyway, and this maybe serves as a reminder of that, especially as we’re headed into Thanksgiving. I bet there are a few turkeys that’ll be prepared, and maybe that’s the other piece, is just the availability of both egg products and turkey. I just did a quick look here and the amount of turkey that’s in cold storage as we come into this Thanksgiving is actually very similar to the last Thanksgiving,” said Secretary Naig.

Naig says his virus is different than the 2015 outbreak. Seven years ago when Iowa got hit, it was primarily during the spring migration. Naig urges poultry producers to always assume that new animals might be carrying the disease.

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