Lawmakers are having trouble finding ways to fund the new Farm Bill

It has been one month since the 2018 Farm Bill expired, and a new version has yet to see floor time in Congress.

Ag leaders say while work continues behind the scenes, there are still big differences on how to fund this year’s record-setting legislation.

This year’s Farm Bill will be the most expensive one in history, and Chuck Conner, president of the National Council of Farmer Co-ops say lawmakers are still finding themselves at odds over funding it.

He tells Brownfield Ag News there have been challenges to funding the Commodities Title and debates over taking money from the Nutrition Title.

Finding new money will not be easy, and new House Speaker Mike Johnson says the nation’s debt is a problem.

“The debt has crossed almost 33.6 trillion dollars. In the time that it’s going to take me to deliver this speech, it will go up another 20 million in debt—it’s unsustainable. The skyrocketing cost of living is unsustainable, and Americans should not have to worry about how they’re going to feed their family every week because they can’t afford their groceries anymore. We have to bring relief to the American people by reining in federal spending and bringing down inflation.”

Johnson tells fellow House lawmakers that he wants the Farm Bill voted on no later than December. He has not mentioned an extension, but some key ag lawmakers believe one will be needed, especially given the recent delays on Capitol Hill.

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