Protecting Children on the Farm: How Rep. Keller is defending the farmer

Congress is back in session and had a busy day!

The House Education and Labor Committee held one of the hearings today and it examined workplace protections for child farm workers. Representative Fred Keller out of Pennsylvania was a part of that hearing and said farmers are being made out to be the victim here when that is not the case at all. He says the real factors to put the blame on are an open border and inflation.

“As a young child, I worked on a farm. I was 14, 15 years old. I helped bale hay and do chores on the farm and you know as far as farmers saying go run dangerous equipment, that didn’t happen. Farmers don’t want people hurt and it troubles me that we are having these hearings when Secretary Walsh was before the committee and I asked him, I had asked him 3 times and my experience in working in a factory or working on a farm that the people who own that business cared and they cared about my well being,” said Keller.

Representative Keller said working on the farm at a young age taught him life skills like how to drive and a sense of work ethic that he uses in his position today.

Related:

What is one childhood farm chore you do not miss?

“No better place to raise a child than a farm”

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