USDA offers some program flexibility in an effort to help producers impacted by flooding

Farmers and ranchers in the Northeast have suffered production and physical losses due to flooding. The USDA Undersecretary Xochitl Torres Small says the agency is committed to helping them recover.

For those producers impacted by floods, the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA) is now offering disaster program flexibility.

Farmers and ranchers in the Northeast have suffered production and physical losses due to flooding. The USDA Undersecretary Xochitl Torres Small says the agency is committed to helping them recover.

The Farm Service Agency has authorized policy exceptions in all flood-impacted counties in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

The exceptions apply to Farm Storage Facility Loans, the Livestock Indemnity Program, and the Non-Insured Crop Disaster Assistance Program. Also, if producers are behind on paying their FSA Marketing Assistance Loan, they should contact their local USDA office.

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