“Distinct threat to public safety” : Bill aimed at keeping AM radio passes Senate committee

As several vehicle manufacturers look to put an end to AM radio in new vehicles, Senate lawmakers say that the issue boils down to a matter of public safety.

According to Sen. Edward Markey, “This bill is about safety technology in an increasingly unsafe climate. It grew out of warnings from emergency management officials that the removal of AM radio of vehicles poses a distinct threat to public safety. Our important bill will ensure that all vehicles including electric vehicles are equipped with AM radio and have access to critical alerts during emergencies. Recently, there have been a rising number of concerns about this bill’s impact on electric vehicles. I want to be clear, we must transition away from gas-powered vehicles to the cars of the future, but as we move to a cleaner, greener future, we must also face the consequences of decades of carbon-belching cars on our roadways, extreme heat, extreme storms, other climate fuel disasters. When those storms strike, created by greenhouse gases, EV drivers and passengers deserve to have the same access to AM radio as their counterparts in gas-fired cars. They should be able to get the warnings on their AM cars, what to do, where to go, there is a tornado heading your way in rural America.”

The bipartisan bill passed in the committee and is now being sent to the full Senate, who will vote on the bill after the August recess.
The National Association of Farm Broadcasting is urging listeners to reach out to their representatives and tell them how AM radio impacts their daily lives in rural America.

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