Grain

A grain management specialist with Iowa State University recommends producers keep a close eye on bin management in warmer weather to mitigate grade damage and more.
Last year, the U.S. imported almost $430 billion from Canada.
Market analysts, including a chief strategist at Allendale. regard the recent, surprising surge in grain exports from Ukraine with cautious optimism.
Leaders in the grain industry are preparing to confront a variety of issues head-on, including storage constraints, labor shortages, and persistent supply chain disruptions.
In a bid to increase the competitiveness of American corn on the global stage, the U.S. Grains Council has embarked on a research endeavor in collaboration with the University of Illinois.
The Panama Canal could become the number one challenge facing the U.S. grain export system this year, says Mike Steenhoek, Executive Director of the Soy Transportation Coalition.
The drought along the Mississippi River is over, for now, according to the Army Corps of Engineers.
The European Agriculture Commissioner is proposing a policy shift as farmers continue to protest, suggesting an EU-wide change on rules that limit ag production, saying the current laws raise food security risks.
USDA Meteorologist Brad Rippey says we are heading into spring rather quickly and ahead of schedule, which could have negative implications for small grains and blooming fruit crops.
South Dakota legislators voted against a ban on weather modification experiments over sustainability concerns and hindrance on grain and ethanol production.
Ships that previously would have gone through the Suez Canal in Egypt are now being diverted below and around South Africa due to military tensions.
Total Farm Marketing’s Bryan Doherty expects to see some shifts in spring planting now that grain markets are in a lull driven by an excess in supply.
A father and son team in Nebraska has built a robot to keep producers safe from the sudden dangers of grain bins.
China has been rebuilding its pork herd after an outbreak of African Swine Fever, but so far, demand is not matching supplies. That is putting the market under pressure — and experts say, prices may not recover until late next year.
American agricultural exports will soon slow down as the Panama Canal dries up.