NASDA Conference 2023: A Glimpse into Agricultural Policy Priorities

The National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA) Conference is currently underway in Cheyenne, Wyoming, bringing together representatives from agricultural departments across nearly all 50 states and four U.S. territories for their annual meeting.

The National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA) Conference is currently underway in Cheyenne, Wyoming, bringing together representatives from agricultural departments across nearly all 50 states and four U.S. territories for their annual meeting.

Representatives from agricultural departments nationwide converge on Cheyenne for this crucial meeting. According to NASDA Senior Director of Policy RJ Carney, this year’s conference theme, “Old West, New Frontiers,” sets the tone for discussions.

Key Priorities for NASDA

  1. Welcoming U.S. Dept of Agriculture’s new Deputy Secretary Xochtil Torres Small: The conference is honored to host the Deputy Secretary of USDA Torres Small. Her presence signifies the importance of federal-state collaboration in shaping agricultural policy.
  2. Emphasis on Conservation: Conservation is a central theme of the annual meeting, underscoring the importance of sustainable agricultural practices. Conversations will revolve around why conservation is critical for smart agricultural policies.
  3. Agricultural Research: Ensuring robust funding for agricultural research is crucial. This funding, like land grants and extension services, supports the competitiveness of farmers and ranchers both nationally and internationally.
  4. Addressing Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) Concerns: Representatives from the Food & Drug Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, and USDA will engage with NASDA members to find solutions and facilitate research efforts to address PFOS-related challenges.

This year is also a Farm Bill year, with the current 2023 Farm Bill set to expire at the end of the month. Carney highlights NASDA’s vigilance in monitoring Congress’ actions on the legislation as well as ensuring NASDA’s priorities are well-represented in any potential extensions or the development of a 2023 (or 2024) Farm Bill.

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