USDA and Smithsonian’s Museum of Natural History join forces to bolster plant health against invasive species

The partnership will help pioneer an initiative against invasive threats.

In a promising start to the new year, the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA) embarked on a groundbreaking partnership with the Smithsonian’s Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C.

This alliance is geared towards fortifying the nation’s plant health defenses against invasive species. The collaboration is set to propel the understanding and collection of resources pertaining to exotic insect species, weed seeds, and other contaminant plant parts.

Under this innovative agreement, entomologists and botanists gain exclusive access to the Museum’s state-of-the-art laboratory space, extensive collections, and rich libraries. The joint efforts aim to bolster research capabilities, foster knowledge exchange, and enhance the collective arsenal against potential threats to U.S. agriculture.

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