An Unforgettable Gift: Wrangler & National FFA surprise Trace Adkins with a new FFA Jacket

Wrangler and the National FFA were proud to bestow country-music superstar and dedicated FFA alum, Trace Adkins, with a new blue jacket after losing his iconic treasure in a house fire.

The 2023 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo is underway in Las Vegas! As part of this landmark ProRodeo event, the National FFA Organization partnered with Wrangler to bless Trace Adkins, one of country music’s biggest stars, with an unforgettable gift. Not to mention, a special trip down memory lane!

“First of all, I was the president of my chapter in my high school in Sarepta, Louisiana,” Adkins said. “FFA was a huge part of my life.”

Adkins lost his iconic blue jacket over a decade ago — one of many losses in a devastating house fire.

“My house burned about 15 years ago or something like that,” he shared. “So it burned up my jacket and I didn’t think I would ever have another one. I mentioned it to my wife a few weeks ago — I saw a kid wearing his FFA jacket, and I said, ‘Gosh, I wish I still had my jacket. It’s too bad.’ She just took the ball and ran with it, and here we are. So, Merry Christmas to me!”

Wrangler and the National FFA were proud to bestow the dedicated FFA alumni with a brand-new blue jacket as a token of their appreciation for his continued advocacy and support of the future of agriculture.

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