Driest “in a Lifetime:" A look at the NOAA’s latest precipitation data from the Corn Belt

The National Drought Mitigation Center says this dryness has been building in the Corn Belt since the fall of 2019, impacting soil moisture levels, streamflows, and crop production.

Meteorologists are calling today’s western Corn Belt the driest in a lifetime.

That is based on recent data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) over four years, dating back to 2019. The assessment is specifically true for the state of Iowa.

In total, over the four years, Iowa received 113 inches of rain, marking a sharp decrease of 27 inches in that period compared to the average precipitation value of 144 inches per year recorded between 1991 and 2020. It also marks the eighth driest four-year stretch since 1895 — more than 125 years ago!

The National Drought Mitigation Center says this dryness has been building in the Corn Belt since the fall of 2019, impacting soil moisture levels, streamflows, and crop production.

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