How an early spring could affect small grains and fruit crops

USDA Meteorologist Brad Rippey says we are heading into spring rather quickly and ahead of schedule, which could have negative implications for small grains and blooming fruit crops.

Warmer weather is on the docket for much of the South next week, with some 90+ degree temperatures expected for Texas.

U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA) Meteorologist Brad Rippey says we are heading into spring rather quickly and ahead of schedule. He shares the implications for small grains and blooming fruit crops.

“You do have to consider the fact that these crops, as well as some of the grasses, are moving along at a pace that’s a week or two at least ahead of schedule. It does open up the possibility that we could see damaging spring freezes even with a normal spring freeze, and certainly if we had a sharp or later than average cold outbreak. That is a concern for things like winter wheat in the south, blooming fruit crops as well as ornamentals — all of which can be pushed along by this warm spring weather.”
Brad Rippey, USDA Meteorologist

Rippey says December was the warmest December on record, then we had a brief cold outbreak in January and now we are on track for another record setting warm month in February.

Related Stories
While the “I” states are waiting for better weather, corn plantings are picking up in drier corners of farm country.

LATEST STORIES BY THIS AUTHOR:

Congress has already approved more than $11 million for design work and $45 million for the first phase of construction, which is set to begin next month.
Ongoing dryness is taking its toll on corn crop production in Mexico and South Africa, two other top global corn producers, as U.S. corn producers see some relief.
The inflation rate seems to be dropping faster here in the United States than in Canada, but according to the chief economist with one of Canada’s largest banks, looks can be deceiving.
High input costs are standing in the way of farmers intending to shift to more sustainable practices, according to research by McKinsey and Company.