Texas rancher faces herd management in the Smokehouse Creek Fire’s aftermath

As we learn more about the damages from the Panhandle fires, a Texas rancher shares how they’re managing herds with what resources they have left.

As we learn more about the damages from the Panhandle fires, a Texas rancher shares how they’re managing herds with what resources they have left.

“Everybody’s making it, trying to figure out what we got living and shooting everything that can’t make it, and trying to get everything to the pens where we can at least give them hay or ship them cattle. Everybody’s deals a little different, but everybody’s trying to just manage the wreck best they can. Some people around we found country to ship them other places and then if you’re fortunate and if you ain’t, you gotta have all that. You gotta feed them hay, and you’re gonna have to feed them hay, for quite a few months, you know.”
Billy Hall, Texas Rancher

Thankfully though, ranchers are still helping ranchers during this time of need. Hall shares how the Akaska Development Corporation out of South Dakota is lending a helping hand through feed and hay donations.

“Yeah, it’s amazing how generous people are. And yeah, there’s sure a great big need, you know. I mean we got 43,000 acres and about every bit of it is burnt, about just about every bit of it’s gone. You know, so it would be a huge help. Huge help be a lifesaver. I mean a lot of people ain’t got. We ain’t got enough money to take care of all of them, you know? So you have to feed them everything they’re getting to eat.”
Billy Hall, Texas Rancher

The Akaska Development Corporation says the first loads of hay will leave South Dakota today.

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