Soybean Struggle: Frost in the forecast threatens damage to soy crops in the Upper Midwest

Recent dry and hot conditions sped up soybean crop maturity, causing a lot of variability in the crop. Now, a threat of frost in some areas of the U.S. threatens more damage to soybeans.

Soybean producers in the Midwest and Upper Midwestern areas of the United States need to keep an eye on the weather this wee as harvest season continues to monitor the potential for frost in the forecast that could threaten struggling soybean crops.

A sharp drop in temperatures across the Plains and Great Lakes region is expected this week due to incoming cold weather from Canada. Recent dry and hot conditions sped up soybean crop maturity, causing a lot of variability in the crop.

Temperatures below 32°F can damage soybean leaves. Likewise, if crops are exposed to sustained temperatures below 30°F, it can damage stems, pods, and seeds. Temps at or below 28°F are considered a killing freeze for beans.

The RFD-TV Weather Team also predicts heavy rain this week, so crops may be hit with flooding, too.

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