U.S. hog producers should keep a close eye on Australian pig virus outbreak

Health experts are encouraging U.S. producers to keep a close eye on Australia’s hog herd as a virus has wiped out anywhere from 3 to 10 percent of the commonwealth’s herd.

“That’s about the magnitude that we had in 2013 and 2014 when we had the outbreak of PED. That was significant here,” said Swine Health Information Center Executive Director Dr. Paul Sundberg.

Japanese Encephalitis is spread through mosquitoes, and experts fear an infected insect could make entry to the U.S. by airplane. The USDA says there is only a slight chance of the virus becoming established in the U.S., but it is likely that at least one infected mosquito is getting into the U.S. every year.

JEV does not transmit from hogs to people as a food-borne illness, but humans can get it from the mosquito itself.

Related:

USDA works hard to keep U.S. swine herd disease-free

Recent outbreaks of PEDV linked to swine shown at livestock shows

National Pork Board announces $15 million in additional funding for Swine Health Information Center

Researchers are developing a rapid African swine fever test






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