Fertilizer



High input costs are standing in the way of farmers intending to shift to more sustainable practices, according to research by McKinsey and Company.
According to a new USDA-ERS report, technological advancements in agriculture led to significant output increases while reducing input usage for producers.
As warmer, drier weather exacerbates wildfires, agricultural experts warn of potential nitrogen-related issues in fields that need to be managed carefully.
As spring approaches, farmers in Minnesota face critical decisions regarding their fertilizer strategies. Here are some expert tips from the state’s extension program.
Throughout the growing season, Mosaic advises farmers to monitor crop nutrition actively. Regular soil testing and plant tissue analysis can help identify any deficiencies or imbalances.
The Center for Biological Diversity launched a map project to reduce pesticide use near endangered species habitats. However, there are some concerns over the accuracy of the maps.
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently unveiled a new herbicide plan, sparking concerns among soybean farmers across the United States.
Mark McHargue addresses artificial intelligence in agriculture, the Farm Bill, and the fertilizer supply chain.
The Fertilizer Institute says we are headed into a more normal market period in terms of fertilizer prices.
Brazilian soybean producers are shelling out a lot more on input costs than U.S. farmers, according to a new study. However, while Midwestern producers are paying less for inputs overall, many of those costs are inflating at a faster rate.
Record-low water levels are popping up along the Mighty Mississippi.
Seven out of the eight major fertilizers saw recent price decreases. However, one key type of fertilizer bucked the overall trend with an 11-percent rise.
Historical data shows farmers today are weathering spikes in fertilizer prices more effectively than producers did fifty years ago.
Just last week, anhydrous was down six percent, and experts say farmers are looking to lock in an attractive deal on fertilizer before fall.
Researchers at Florida Atlantic University’s Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute found human sewage, not fertilizer, is mainly responsible for dangerous nitrogen levels in Florida’s Indian River Lagoon.